Friday, September 23, 2011

Gene Variant May Raise Death Risk After Heart Bypass

(HealthDay News) -- People who carry a certain genetic variant involved in blood clotting and inflammation have a lower five-year survival rate after coronary artery bypass surgery, researchers report.

The findings should be used to better treat and ensure the survival of these surgical patients over the long-term, said the research team from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C.

"There are possibilities that we could apply this information someday to a patient's prognosis, and for careful monitoring or increased surveillance if a person has a 2.5 times higher risk of dying, instead of letting them go their way after a CABG [coronary artery bypass graft] surgery," study senior author Mihai Podgoreanu, an assistant professor of anesthesiology, said in a Duke news release.

In conducting the study, published in the Sept. 12 issue of Circulation, the researchers found variants in the thrombomodulin gene were associated with greater risk of death in the five years following CABG surgery in a group of roughly 1,000 patients.

The researchers also took other known risk factors into consideration and confirmed their findings by repeating the study with a separate group of about 1,000 more patients. Read more...

Cardiofy Heart Care Supplement

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